What does Roman Empire mean?

Definitions for Roman Empire
Ro·man Em·pire

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Roman Empire.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Roman Empirenoun

    an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome

Wiktionary

  1. Roman Empirenoun

    An empire that used to exist between 27 and 476/1453 ; it encompassed territories stretching from Britain and Germany to North Africa and the Persian Gulf.

Wikipedia

  1. Roman Empire

    The Roman Empire (Latin: Imperium Rōmānum [?m?p?ri.?? ro??ma?n??]; Koinē Greek: Βασιλε?α τ?ν ?ωμα?ων, romanized: Basileía t?n Rhōmaíōn) was the post-Republican period of ancient Rome. As a polity it included large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Northern Africa, and Western Asia ruled by emperors. From the accession of Caesar Augustus to the military anarchy of the 3rd century, it was a principate with Italy as metropole of the provinces and the city of Rome as sole capital (27 BC – AD 286). After the military crisis, the empire was ruled by multiple emperors who shared rule over the Western Roman Empire and over the Eastern Roman Empire (also known as the Byzantine Empire). Rome remained the nominal capital of both parts until AD 476, when the imperial insignia were sent to Constantinople, following the capture of Ravenna by the barbarians of Odoacer and the subsequent deposition of Romulus Augustulus. The adoption of Christianity as the state church of the Roman Empire in AD 380 and the fall of the Western Roman Empire to Germanic kings conventionally marks the end of Classical antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Those events, along with the gradual hellenization of the Eastern Roman Empire is why historians distinguish the medieval Roman Empire that remained in the Eastern provinces as the Byzantine Empire. The predecessor state of the Roman Empire, the Roman Republic (which had replaced Rome's monarchy in the 6th century BC) became severely destabilized in a series of civil wars and political conflicts. In the mid-1st century BC, Julius Caesar was appointed as perpetual dictator and then assassinated in 44 BC. Civil wars and proscriptions continued, culminating in the victory of Octavian, Caesar's adopted son, over Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC. The following year Octavian conquered Ptolemaic Egypt, ending the Hellenistic period that had begun with the conquests of Alexander the Great of Macedon in the 4th century BC. Octavian's power then became unassailable, and in 27 BC the Roman Senate formally granted him overarching power and the new title Augustus, effectively making him the first Roman emperor. The first two centuries of the Empire saw a period of unprecedented stability and prosperity known as the Pax Romana ("Roman Peace"). Rome reached its greatest territorial expanse during the reign of Trajan (AD 98–117). A period of increasing trouble and decline began with the reign of Commodus (177–192). In the 3rd century the Empire underwent a crisis that threatened its existence, as the Gallic Empire and Palmyrene Empire broke away from the Roman state, and a series of short-lived emperors, often from the legions, led the empire. The empire was reunified under Aurelian (r. 270–275). In an effort to stabilize it, Diocletian set up two different imperial courts in the Greek East and Latin West in 286. Christians rose to positions of power in the 4th century following the Edict of Milan of 313. Shortly after, the Migration Period, involving large invasions by Germanic peoples and by the Huns of Attila, led to the decline of the Western Roman Empire. With the fall of Ravenna to the Germanic Herulians and the deposition of Romulus Augustus in AD 476 by Odoacer, the Western Roman Empire finally collapsed; the Eastern Roman Emperor Zeno formally abolished it in AD 480. While the Eastern Roman Empire survived for another millennium, until Constantinople fell to the Ottoman Turks of Sultan Mehmed II in 1453.Due to the Roman Empire's vast extent and long endurance, the institutions and culture of Rome had a profound and lasting influence on the development of language, religion, art, architecture, philosophy, law, and forms of government in the territory it governed, and far beyond. The Latin language of the Romans evolved into the Romance languages of the medieval and modern world, while Medieval Greek became the language of the Eastern Roman Empire. The Empire's adoption of Christianity led to the formation of medieval Christendom. Greek and Roman art had a profound impact on the Italian Renaissance. Rome's architectural tradition served as the basis for Romanesque, Renaissance and Neoclassical architecture, and also had a strong influence on Islamic architecture. The corpus of Roman law has its descendants in many legal systems of the world today, such as the Napoleonic Code, while Rome's republican institutions have left an enduring legacy, influencing the Italian city-state republics of the medieval period, as well as the early United States and other modern democratic republics.

Freebase

  1. Roman Empire

    The Roman Empire was the post-Republican period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterised by an autocratic form of government and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean in Europe, Africa, and Asia. The 500-year-old Roman Republic, which preceded it, had been destabilized through a series of civil wars. Several events marked the transition from Republic to Empire, including Julius Caesar's appointment as perpetual dictator; the Battle of Actium; and the granting of the honorific Augustus to Octavian by the Roman Senate. The first two centuries of the Empire were a period of unprecedented stability and prosperity known as the Pax Romana. It reached its greatest expanse during the reign of Trajan. In the 3rd century, the Empire underwent a crisis that threatened its existence, but was reunified and stabilized under the emperors Aurelian and Diocletian. Christians rose to power in the 4th century, during which time a system of dual rule was developed in the Latin West and Greek East. After the collapse of central government in the West in the 5th century, the eastern half continued as what would later be known as the Byzantine Empire.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Roman Empire in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Roman Empire in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of Roman Empire in a Sentence

  1. Joe McConnell:

    To find evidence that a volcano on the other side of the Earth erupted and effectively contributed to the demise of the Romans and the( ancient) Egyptians and the rise of Roman Empire is fascinating, people have been speculating about this for many years, so it's exciting to be able to provide some answers.

  2. Voltaire:

    This agglomeration which was called and which still calls itself the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire.

  3. Voltaire:

    The Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, nor Roman nor an Empire.

  4. Bill Clinton:

    Ben Carson says marriage equality is what caused the fall of the Roman Empire, ted Cruz slammed a political opponent for marching in a pride parade.

  5. Chris Chinnock:

    We do know that Roman Empire relied quite heavily on slave labor. Roman Empire underpinned much of Roman Empire throughout history. And Roman Empire was true of Roman Britain as well. We have lots of literary evidence from wood, writing tablets and stone carvings.

Images & Illustrations of Roman Empire

  1. Roman EmpireRoman EmpireRoman EmpireRoman EmpireRoman Empire


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